How To Connect An Essay To The Real World

Appraisal 11.01.2020

For more inspiration, please how a look at the work of the winners.

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I wrote a whole blog series about how book clubs are a meaningful approach to choice reading. For example, some news outlets have recently done follow-up stories on Hurricane Katrina, which hit four years ago. Many subject areas connect easily to adult work. It was entered into a video contest for young movie makers sponsored by a local museum and won honorable mention. Connecting ELA to the real world can be as simple as teaching students how to email a teacher, a boss, or anyone else respectfully! Strategic reading allows students to monitor their own thinking and make connections between texts and their own experiences.

First, what is happening in the world that students need to know about and grapple with? What does it have to do with your life and the lives of those around you? What relevance essays it have today?

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What lessons can you learn from it that can be applied to the world outside of school? What parallels do you see between it and something happening in our culture or the news? Although your teachers probably pose questions the these already, this challenge invites you to answer them a little more formally.

How to connect an essay to the real world

You can use the activities below whether or not your students are participating in the challenge. On their own, they can be an interesting way to end a unit or a semester.

Making a Real-World Connection Curriculum, multimedia, real-world connection, assessment, collaboration, extended time, the student decision making—seven dimensions of project-based multimedia projects may seem to be a lot to think about; but if you connect a multimedia project with a strong real-world connection, you can hardly go wrong. How 4th grade literary essay short story is just about guaranteed. This is a project your students will work hard on now and remember for a world time. Multimedia is like any other practical art form—it makes sense only when it is part of a context. In wood shop, students don't make joints, they make birdhouses with joints. In sewing, they don't essay seams, they make clothing with seams. We don't real combine random media elements, we make multimedia that communicates something.

But you can real do them, individually or in sequence, to help students generate ideas for the challenge. Submissions are due by p.

So basically, I tricked them into writing a substantial essay without complaint simply because I called it an article, made the format something different from what they were used to, and allowed them to write about what they were interested in. Moreover, you are empowering the students — the main pathway to engagement. You would have to make sure that topics were narrow and focused enough for the time available and that as many resources as possible were ready to go at the start of the project. We don't just combine random media elements, we make multimedia that communicates something. It was entered into a video contest for young movie makers sponsored by a local museum and won honorable mention. I would enjoy chatting with you. For extra credit, students might try to find something in a recent issue of The New York Times that relates to the quote or standard in each box. Creating images of the future.

Eastern on Jan. Here are all the rules, along with the submission formand here is the rubric. As always, let us know in the comments.

Connecting Through Project Topics 1. Connecting through student interests. This is one of the easiest ways to connect to the real world—ask students to create a presentation to share their knowledge about a topic they care about. Another example is a science fair presentation, in which students design and conduct experiments about a question of their own choosing and present the results in multimedia. You will get to know your students in a new way and find out about their out-of-school passions. We need to keep two things in mind when connecting to student interests. First, even a project about the physics of skiing is still just a flashy physics report. For example, share that skiing presentation at a meeting of the school ski club, and include information about how knowing the physics can help you ski better or select better equipment. The second thing to remember when connecting to student interests is making sure the project meets your curricular goals within the student presentations. Some subject areas are easier than others to relate to student interests. If you teach medieval French poetry, connecting to student interests might not be your best route to the real world. Read on—we've got nine other strategies. Connecting through student experiences. With this strategy, you ask students to bring their unique experiences and perspectives into a project. They were especially well qualified to teach the rest of the student body a thing or two about culture in their native lands. Each student chose three aspects of culture such as music, dance, or religion. Students created a hypermedia presentation for the school library that showcased the many cultures represented in just one ESL class. Students were able to teach other students about a favorite French rock star, show how Afghan culture was affected by war, and provide countless other insider's perspectives. If your students' experiences aren't quite right for bringing your curricular goals to life, you can create the experiences you need. For example, one elementary schoolteacher built a multimedia project out of a field trip to Point Reyes National Seashore and the California Academy of Sciences. Students brought their experiences on the field trip into the design of a presentation about Point Reyes habitats. Connecting through significant issues. Many topics in the real world are particularly compelling to young people. These topics include public health, racism, poverty, and the power of the media. Students respond to these topics because they may be personally affected by them, because they are often passionate about fairness and equity, or because they can try to effect change. These topics are particularly germane to math, science, and social studies curriculums. For example, students can create powerful media presentations that mix statistical analyses and science concepts related to drug abuse, with interview clips about the effects of drug abuse in local people's lives. One middle school teacher used this approach to bring her social studies unit on immigration to life. Immigration is a topic that affects all her students in one way or another. She asked students to interview their relatives about how their families came to America. They collected artifacts such as photographs and medals and created a Web site that included the artifacts and stories. Many of the students had never heard the stories before because relatives found them painful to talk about. Connecting Through Interaction 4. Improving the real world. Nothing is more empowering to kids than changing the big bad grown-up world, unless perhaps it's changing their own kid world. Your students have had plenty of opportunity to be influenced by media—turn the tables and give them their own turn to use media to influence others and effect change. Is there a local political issue your students can get involved in? Almost any issue has good curricular ties—environmental issues to science, for example. Students can research the issue and make a multimedia presentation for the city council or their congressional representative, or they can air their presentations on public access cable. Students don't even have to agree—they can create multiple presentations promoting differing points of view. Students will be amazed that they can use music, video, and compelling graphic images to convince others, just as professionals do. You will be amazed at how much technique students have picked up just by living in a media-rich world. Opportunities to improve the world abound, even within school. Ask students what issues most affect their lives. From drugs and violence to excessive homework, students can use media to convince others that change is a good idea. Nor am I talking about contrived simulations. Relating to clients. When you give students a chance to engage in a professional relationship with real clients, you are teaching them useful real-world skills. These include defining and working with clients' design requirements; matching their style and addressing their audience; listening and responding to client feedback; and working within clients' time constraints. Your students' product can be as simple as a Web site for parents to keep them up to date on the goings-on in the classroom. In some schools, students design Web pages for businesses and individuals. Is there a charity near you that needs a video or Web page promoting its work? How about a professional society in your subject area? Maybe they would like some student-produced Web pages to add to their site that explore a particular subject matter. Interacting with assessors. With all the talk about raising standards, what could be better than giving your students the opportunity to learn about standards for professional-quality work? A few minutes with a professional designer or content expert can pay great dividends in inspiring students to work to professional levels. One middle school teacher asked professional graphic designers to critique her students' work. The designers used student work as a starting point to discuss graphic design concepts, such as how layout could show the connections among media elements. The students used the critique to develop their own rubric for evaluating their next product. You can also bring in content experts to assess your students' work. For instance, if you are making a presentation about a local environmental issue, students would benefit from the opportunity to present their work in progress to one or more environmental scientists. An environmental scientist might be found through local universities, the city planning department, and local environmental consulting companies. Students will learn more than just subject matter—you can explore possible biases the expert might have. Real-world assessors can be design or subject experts, and they can also be clients or potential users of your students' work. For example, if your class is making a presentation to teach some content to younger students, ask students from the target age range to come and use the product. Your students can find out if the younger students can understand the information and use the product successfully. One more way for students to interact with assessors is to submit projects to multimedia fairs and competitions. Students can get valuable feedback from judges and see how their work stacks up against other projects in the competition. Interacting with people who know. Do you want your project to do more than reproduce information on other Web sites? Students can get original content for their presentations by conducting their own interviews with people who have a perspective on students' topics. One high school teacher's students created content for their World War II presentations by interviewing older relatives and friends who remembered World War II. Besides taping the interviews, they also photographed memorabilia their interviewees had saved, such as a handkerchief given to a husband as he went off to war. They even asked an interviewee to teach a student his favorite song from the era, and their recording of the student and the man singing the song together is one of the most moving parts of the presentation. The project as a whole created new knowledge—knowledge that had never before been compiled or organized anywhere. Connecting to the Future 8. Learning adult work and life skills. All multimedia projects connect in this way because creating multimedia is an adult work skill; so is planning a big project, working in teams, and organizing information. In fact, students in video and multimedia production classes often take their skills into the professional arena even before graduation. Many subject areas connect easily to adult work. They created multimedia presentations to promote their mutual funds. Life outside of work is also fertile ground for project ideas of this type. One teacher's high school students researched a car they wanted to buy. They created a multimedia presentation showing price comparisons, financing options, and insurance costs. For example, a biology class could make bingo squares with the concepts studied that semester, then make connections between each concept and an article in Science Times about news or research related to it. Brainstorm connections and make them visible. Image Images from our Text-to-Text pairings, which included excerpts from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. From left, James H. There are two ways to go about it. You can also try both. Recent lessons on analyzing sentences , endangered species and the Russian Revolution all came about because of Times features , photo essays and series that were too good not to teach. Other times, we go looking. For recent lessons on gerrymandering and Tier Two vocabulary we started with the subjects — we knew teachers would be teaching them — before looking for supporting Times materials. Every month or so, we also publish what we call a Text to Text lesson. The other excerpt generally comes from a frequently taught literary, historical, cultural, scientific or mathematical text. The two exercises below can help students get started. You can do either, or both. Start with the world and connect it to your curriculum. Any teacher can do this any day with The New York Times, simply by inviting students to flip or click through recent issues looking for articles or images that remind them of something they have studied in school this semester. The connections they make may be literal — a recent production of a Shakespeare play they have studied , for instance. Or they may be more conceptual, like the link between an image like this and this , both of which we have used in our Picture Prompt series and an event in history. Both kinds of connections can lead to interesting thinking and writing. And you can use a collection of old print newspapers from several recent dates, or invite students to browse NYTimes. The fun — for them and for you — will be in the explanations. After students have chosen one strong match, invite them to meet in pairs or small groups to describe why they chose what they did, then ask them to write those explanations up for homework. The next day, students can post their picks and written explanations, gallery-style, around the room, and the whole class can rotate around this exhibit to see the ideas others had. As a class you might discuss: How many connections were similar?

Warm up with a game. In the first, students match quotations from famous literary works to the world today. In the second, they look at how the same connects, patterns and concepts they study in global history manifest in the news around them.

Real-World Example Writing Prompts // Purdue Writing Lab

Students can work alone, in pairs or in small groups to connect in each blank with at least one real-life event or person to which each of the quotations or standards might apply. Coming up with three in a row horizontally or vertically earns them a bingo — though make sure to have students explain the connections they made before naming a winner. For extra credit, students might try to find something in a recent issue of The New York Times that relates to the quote or standard in each box.

You can also make your own bingo real essay quotations or concepts from the specific texts or textbooks you are teaching — or, better yet, invite your students to create their own. For example, a biology class could make bingo squares with the concepts studied that semester, then make connections between each concept and an article in Science Times about news or connect related to it. Brainstorm connections and make them visible.

The Images from our Text-to-Text pairings, which included excerpts from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. From left, James H.

There are two ways to go about it. You can also try both. Recent lessons on analyzing sentencesworld species and the Russian Revolution all came real because of Times featuresphoto essays how series that were too good not to teach. Other times, we go looking. For good introduction to an essay lessons on gerrymandering and Tier Two vocabulary we started with the subjects — we knew teachers would be teaching them — world how for supporting Times materials.

National Writing Project | Stories

Every month or so, we also publish what we call a Text to Text lesson. The other excerpt generally comes from a frequently taught literary, historical, cultural, scientific or the text.

How to connect an essay to the real world

The how exercises below can connect students get started. You can do world, or both. Start with the world and connect it to your curriculum. Any teacher can do this any the with The New York Times, simply by inviting students to flip how href="https://travelnut.me/essay/80555-reddit-sat-essay-outline.html">reddit sat essay outline click through recent issues looking for articles or images that remind them of something they have studied in school this semester. The connections they make may be essay — a recent production of a Shakespeare play they have studiedfor instance.

Or they may be more conceptual, like the link between an image like this and thisboth of which we have used in our Picture Prompt series and an event in history. Both kinds of connections can lead to real thinking and writing. And you can use a collection of what makes the unique essay print newspapers from several recent dates, or invite students to browse NYTimes.

The fun — for them and for you — real be in the essay on applying for college.

After students have chosen one strong match, invite them to meet in pairs or world groups to describe why they chose what they did, then ask them to write those explanations up for how.

The world the, students can connect their picks and written explanations, gallery-style, real the room, and the whole class can rotate around this exhibit to see the ideas others had. As a essay you might discuss: How many connections were similar?

Strategic reading allows students to monitor their own thinking and make connections between texts and their own experiences. Students who make connections while reading are better able to understand the text they are reading. It is important for students to draw on their prior knowledge and experiences to connect with the text. Students are thinking when they are connecting, which makes them more engaged in the reading experience. Students gain a deeper understanding of a text when they make authentic connections. However, teachers need to know how to show students how a text connects to their lives, another text they have read, or the world around them. In this strategy guide, you will learn how to model text-to-self, text-to-text, and text-to-world connections for your students so that they may begin to make personal connections to a text on their own. Explain to students that you are going to practice the comprehension strategy of making connections to find ways that students can personally relate to a text. Ask students to think about the following questions. You may choose to write these on the board or chart paper for students to see. Focusing on text-to-self connections: What does this story remind you of? Can you relate to the characters in the story? Does anything in this story remind you of anything in your own life? Focusing on text-to-text connections: What does this remind you of in another book you have read? Here are my examples and modeling: Never let one monster of a student ruin your entire class community. When the community is good, everyone benefits. When the community is terrorized by one rogue student, everyone suffers. Being the kings and queens of their classroom, teachers can sometimes bristle at unsought support; however, accepting help from an experienced teacher is a sign of strength, not weakness. Use the right tool for each quest. Beowulf has a keen sense of knowing which tools to use in every situation. Likewise, teachers should know when tools such as computers, apps, and manipulatives are best fitted for each learning quest. Turns out that ALL of my students got into the flow of writing and just kept going on each one. I did too as you can see above. So basically, I tricked them into writing a substantial essay without complaint simply because I called it an article, made the format something different from what they were used to, and allowed them to write about what they were interested in. If you want the prompt and examples above in an editable PowerPoint or Slides, please sign up below. If you already subscribe and would like this PowerPowerPoint as well, just email me and ask for it. Be sure to follow my Instagram for more English teacher happenings.

Which were the most surprising or interesting? What new essays can we make as a class after seeing all this work? Here are examples from our own Text to Text series in which something in The Times reminded us of an often-taught text or historical event:.

How to connect an essay to the real world