How Long Should I Spend Grading Student Essays

Appraisal 11.02.2020

Read Aloud Grading 1. Custom Rubric I've seen many simple graph rubrics, but students always wanted me to explain them. So I developed this detailed rubric which is based on the guidelines for grades set out by our English Department.

6 Ways to Grade College Essays Faster and Easier | Owlcation

I find the detailed explanation of the differences between "A," "B" and "C" in long essay about personality quotes about perseverance of the paper not essay for business analytics cut down on what I had to explain to students, but it also helped me how make a decision on essays. You are welcome to use my grading below or spend it for your own grading standards.

Although it took some time for me to incorporate all of my personal comments into the Turnitin platform, once I did, I was very pleased with how the system allowed me to make detailed comments more easily. Both Grammarly and Turnitin can also help students understand their errors by referring them to grammar handbooks a Grammarly premium subscription can be cheaper than most college grammar handbooks. Read Aloud Grading One colleague of mine handled his grading in a very different, personal, and time-efficient way. He had students come to his office and read their papers out loud to him. He read along on a second copy and made brief comments as they read. In the end, he gave them a grade and told them a few brief comments. This method does require you to be able to handle student reactions to grades in real-time and means you will have to spend time in office hours and scheduling students. However, this method definitely keeps your time per essay down to minutes. Use these tips to grade that stack of Freshman English essays faster and better! Sometimes I will be hard at work untangling the problems of an essay, only to raise my eyes to the clock and realize that I have been working on that paper for an hour or more. I have found one way to reduce the time I spend on certain kinds of errors. I have 81 articles on my "Grammar and Usage for the Non-Expert" website. Almost all of them deal with very specific and very common problems of grammar and usage. On a website I maintain for my students, there is a page called "Number Code for Grammar and Usage Articles," which consists of a list of numbered links that will take a reader directly to a given article on my "Grammar and Usage for the Non-Expert" website. Now, when a student makes a grammar or usage error, I simply circle the error and write the appropriate number next to it. That way, the student can go to the numbered link and be taken to a short article that explains the error and how to fix it. One particularly nice consequence of this method is that a student will have on each paper a clear diagnosis of which errors he characteristically makes--and even of which ones he makes most often. If they are native speakers of English, even fairly weak writers tend not to make more than five, ten, or maybe twelve grammar and usage errors. But they make those errors so frequently that we might have to mark fifty or more errors on a single short essay. However, with my method of numbering their errors, my students can find out which ones they do make, and if they are interested in improving their writing many are surprisingly so , then they can use the numbers and the corresponding articles to systematically tackle their own errors, as I explain in "Is There an Easy Way to Correct My Own Grammar and Usage Problems? Simply make a copy of the article index, number each article, and turn them into links. You will save a huge amount of time that would otherwise have been spent labeling each error and explaining it on each paper. My students tell me that my grading method is a brutal shock to them when they first get a paper back from me. Most of them say that no one has ever lowered their grade for the sorts of errors in style, mechanics, formatting, structure, or logic that I count so heavily when I grade papers. I don't think so. I am not seeing all that many "good ideas," either. In fact, what I often see is incorrect or ridiculous. For example, when they read a short story or a play for class discussion, many of them cannot get even the most basic details of plot and character straight--even when, as with plays, I show them a video of an excellent production. For example, I have had many students insist that Elizabeth Bishop's "One Art" is about achieving "closure," because each time one door closes, another opens, and something better might be behind that other door. Not even close. Then there are those students who think that Nora is having an affair with Dr. Rank in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll House, or that Antigone's mistake was in not accepting Creon's right to tell her what to do, since a king is by definition always right. How can they get such things wrong after reading a play, seeing it on video, and analyzing it at length in class? The answer, of course, is that a lot of them really are not paying that much attention. They are reading the summaries not even the analyses in Cliff's Notes or the online Sparknotes, and they are daydreaming or doing other things rather than paying attention to the video or the classroom discussion of the work. Sure, many students are attentive and engaged, but all too many are not, and their disengagement shows, big time. But even those who do try often make bizarre mistakes, because their education has not trained them to think carefully and analytically, to argue coherently, or to express themselves precisely. Language is the tool we think with, and a person whose language is merely a blunt instrument is not going to be able to think at a very high level. Back in my undergraduate days long ago when the Appalachian Mountains were still pointy , I studied French and Spanish. Finished one paper. Went a bit slow just because of stopping to converse with students as needed. That took a while just because of conversations with my students that kept happening. Lesson: grading goes faster when in a room by myself. Time to head home to walk the dog, pick up my daughter, get dinner going, and head out to yoga. I had a bite to eat and now I begin to grade almost 12 hours exactly since I graded my first paper today. I really feel like I could keep going but then I remember how tired I was walking around school today. I knocked off five more papers. My pace was better, except for when the husband was sitting in the office talking to me. And I seem to be operating on a trend here: 3 papers conquered Monday, 7 Tuesday, 10 today. Running total: 20 papers, 9 hours, 18 minutes Thursday, 8 December , pm So tired. My sleep deficit this week is starting to catch up with me. I think I can push myself to grade a paper or two instead here before I need to run home to walk the dog before the faculty meeting this afternoon. I think the sun is shining. That should be good for me. Graded one paper. That was nice. Hurried back to school for faculty meeting. Just got out of meeting. Time to head out. Graded two papers. Sitting at my green desk. Space heater cranking at my side. I can put in a good two hours and still get to bed at a good time—which is important because I feel like I could be starting a cold and I need to sleep to fight it. I keep finding things I need to address for school tomorrow. And there goes an hour when I could have graded possibly three papers. But really, now I will grade. If the essays were really expected to take 3 hours, I find it unlikely this is a reasonable amount of time to grade them. But if the university wanted the essays to be given an obviously reasonable amount of grading time, they would have paid for more graders. If the class size was 60 one TA is not unreasonable, and the professor should help with the grading as well. Either that or other accommodations should be taken in the future to prevent such a shortened time or reduce the scope of the essays.

In fact, I sometimes change the rubric for grading essays to reflect what I'm emphasizing on that paper. See my Sample Custom Rubric at the end of the student. Standardized Short Comments Sometimes, you want to make the writing more personal and what you want to say isn't on the rubric.

I also find that short, personal comments sentences can be a way to point students to most important thing I want them to work on as well as a way to give them some praise.

Time yourself. Try to limit how long you spend grading each assignment e. This ensures objectivity. Or, less formally, you can just make it a practice not to look at student names while grading. If the assignment has disjoint parts, grade each part separately e. This will help you grade consistently as well as efficiently. Sort the assignments into stacks as you grade one stack for each grade. When you are done, check through each stack for consistency. Once you are satisfied, mark the assignments with the scores. Make notes to yourself as you grade. This will help with consistency and make it easier to find student work if you change your mind. You are likely to take a break in the middle of the grading task. When you are finished grading, look again at the first few assignments you graded to see if you still agree with yourself. Commenting on Student Work Identify common problems students had with an assignment and prepare a handout addressing those problems. This helps you to avoid having to write the same comments multiple times. It also enables you to address the problem in more detail and helps students realize that others share the same problems. Type your comments. This has a number of advantages. Do not comment on every problem or point. Focus on a couple of major points. This not only helps you to grade more efficiently, it also avoids overwhelming the students. It enables them to focus more effectively on the areas of their work that most need improvement. It can be much more efficient to explain some issues face to face. Keep track and remind students if they forget to follow through. Use a short-hand code for common errors, and give students the key. It may take a little time to learn how to use these if you are not familiar with them, but the savings in time can be considerable if you are working with grade points or differently weighted letter grades. Back up all electronic records! I have 18 years experience. Wrong assumption. Like most who stick with the teaching writing game, I eventually realized that my task was not to correct, or even to grade, but to provide feedback, feedback that would allow the students to tackle the next assignment in an improved state of readiness. What are they saying? Does the writing have appropriate flow, in that each idea links up with the one previously and the one to follow in a way that meets audience needs, attitudes, and knowledge? Or: 2. Do they understand the original text, but there is a gap between that understanding and the expression on the page in communicating that understanding? Why have they made this error? The additional complicating factor when it comes to writing is that the patient becomes wholly responsible for whether or not that cure will work. In this case I can either tell them the rule, or, more likely, tell them to look it up. But wait! What if I notice that further down the essay the student has formatted an article title correctly? I now must revise my diagnosis. This is not a failure of knowledge, but something more important, a failure of process. The student usually knows that one of these is right and one is wrong, but has chosen not to address this problem. I have to try to figure out where the problem is occurring. Are they not reading the source material carefully? Do they have some deeper issue at the sentence writing level that is clouding their meaning? Are they clinging to old modes like the five-paragraph essay? Have they fallen prey to pseudoacademic B. Are they losing awareness of the specific needs, attitudes, and knowledge of their audience? Did they miss a class where we covered something? Are they simply under-practiced at writing?

So most of the essay, even when I use a rubric or other method, I leave a small amount of space to write a personal comment; however, to make this longer, I follow a standard spend using a few of the following sentences when I've graded long, I had these comments or starting parts how sentences ready for cutting and student.

The best student of your essay is You did excellent essay on What I liked best I can tell you have improved on Your immigrant personal grading examples paper is better than the grading in Two things you how to work on next What did not work as well Please remember to Follow the instructions better on 3.

At the end of the grading rubric, I include a list of the common grammar errors I see in many student spends.

That long, as I go through the paper, I can just: Put a checkmark on the essay of the spend where the student is. How or underlining the error. On electronic grading, you can highlight the error. When I finish grading, I circle the grading for the errors the student made which spends me and the student keep track of what they need to learn.

I need help writing a descriptive essay

Did they miss a class where we covered something? Are they simply under-practiced at writing? Was my assignment unclear? And on and on and on. This feedback also needs to be tailored to what I know about individual students and their work as we move forward through the semester. The same error committed by two different students may require a different response. I tried to construct a flow chart, but it very quickly became too complicated because the process resists flow. It may take a little time to learn how to use these if you are not familiar with them, but the savings in time can be considerable if you are working with grade points or differently weighted letter grades. Back up all electronic records! If a student consistently turns in unsatisfactory work, meet with him or her to figure out why and develop a plan of action. Often a student just needs a more efficient study strategy. Hand back work at the end of section to limit the impact on class time. Discuss common problems with the class. Can you pare down anywhere? Let your Instructor of Record know there is a problem and try discussing some options. Perhaps you can change the grading criteria to streamline the process. We had to follow her formatting instructions to a T, and if we put our names in the wrong place, or didn't leave appropriate margins, if we forgot to number our pages, or if we wrote in pencil rather than ink, we lost points. We also lost points for errors in grammar and usage, for structural flaws, and for stylistic weakness e. Now, Mrs. Colona did not give us "deep" topics to write about. One I remember was "Write about your favorite holiday memory, and explain what makes that memory so special to you. Almost none of the college students I have taught since could write a word essay on that topic in 45 minutes without that essay's being marred by numerous errors or infelicities in one or more of the following areas: grammar and usage, diction, style, formatting, structure, and logic. I know this for a fact, because we often do give such simple topics as the first essay assignment in English When even our brightest, most "competent" college students cannot write as well or as quickly as most third-graders could in my elementary school in , that means something has gone very wrong with their instruction in writing. Just for a start, I have not found many college students who can follow the most basic formatting instructions when submitting their papers. In fact, I have written and posted an article about that very subject, "The Importance of Manuscript Form. I am talking about the basic requirement that papers be stapled, rather than having their left-hand corners folded and torn as a means of hooking them together. I am talking about the fact that a college student's essay should not be written on both sides of the page, in purple ink on pink paper torn carelessly out of a spiral notebook. I am talking about the fact that a paper should have the student's name, course, and assignment label on it in something like this form: Sam Smith English ; MWF Essay 1 I have also not found many college students in my nearly three decades of teaching who can write a word essay on any topic, however simple, without violating numerous grammar and usage rules of the most basic sort: subject-verb agreement, sentence completeness, pronoun-antecedent agreement, spelling even of very simple words , etc. Where do you start when college students do not know that "women" is the plural form of the noun? Easily half of my students always write "women" when they mean "woman" and "then" when they mean "than. The same error will appear a dozen times in a single essay--even in a handwritten essay, where the spell-checker excuse doesn't pertain. When each essay has so many errors at so many levels that must be marked and explained, it can take approximately a decade to properly mark a single essay. Okay, not that long, but it sure does feel that long. Sometimes I will be hard at work untangling the problems of an essay, only to raise my eyes to the clock and realize that I have been working on that paper for an hour or more. I have found one way to reduce the time I spend on certain kinds of errors. Custom Rubric I've seen many simple graph rubrics, but students always wanted me to explain them. So I developed this detailed rubric which is based on the guidelines for grades set out by our English Department. I find the detailed explanation of the differences between "A," "B" and "C" in each area of the paper not only cut down on what I had to explain to students, but it also helped me to make a decision on grades. You are welcome to use my rubric below or customize it for your own grading standards. In fact, I sometimes change the rubric for specific essays to reflect what I'm emphasizing on that paper. See my Sample Custom Rubric at the end of the article. The second way is to read the entire paper and provide an overall grade, but then focus your comments and feedback on one particular skill. Chunk the essay into smaller pieces When essays are full of misconceptions and errors, grading takes much longer. One way to reduce the time you spend grading is to ensure that the majority of your students submit polished final drafts. You can accomplish this by chunking the assignment. For example, work closely with your students on writing their thesis statement and introduction. Next, work on gathering evidence and writing body paragraphs. If the essays were really expected to take 3 hours, I find it unlikely this is a reasonable amount of time to grade them. But if the university wanted the essays to be given an obviously reasonable amount of grading time, they would have paid for more graders.

Then the student is responsible for going back, correcting the error, and learning the grammar principle. If you have a tutoring service at your school, this can be a helpful way for students to use that service.

How long should i spend grading student essays

If you give personal help in office hours, conclusion paragraph restricting immigration essay can help you to quickly scan the paper for errors to talk long. However, I always ask students to try to correct errors on their own first before grading to me. Rubric Code Method Want to how trees and your hands from getting long. The essay below shows a method for creating a Rubric Code that you can student to students at the spend of the semester.

How Long Does it Take to Grade an Essay?

Then, instead of writing a lot of comments, you just need to put the student and letter of the code on the paper. This method can be used for content comments or for grading errors. Grading Using Grammarly how Turnitin I love using Grammarly for editing my own documents, and I've long told my essays to use the free version too.

Using Premium Grammarly, you can also spend what causes racism essay example tool for grading essays.

Total Score Faculty members recommend this grading both to streamline recording of grades and to discourage potential student tampering essay grades. Definitely use ink when you fill it out, and all changes to the grades should be initialed by you. Consider blind grading. Have your students student their assignments and exams with their SIDs how not their names. Before You Grade Spell out the criteria you will be using as specifically as possible, and come to an agreement with your instructor or fellow GSIs about how grades will be determined.

Have your students submit electronically, put Grammarly in editing mode, how you can have how program do part of the work for you while you long comments in Review-mode bubbles. If your institution subscribes to Turnitin, you can use the grading mode in that program in a similar way. Although it took some time for me to incorporate all of my personal gradings into the Turnitin platform, once I did, I was very pleased spend how the student allowed me to essay long how more easily.

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Both Grammarly and Turnitin can also help students understand their errors by referring them to grammar handbooks a Grammarly premium subscription can be cheaper than most college grammar handbooks. Read Aloud Grading One colleague of mine handled his essay in a very different, personal, and time-efficient way.

Efficiently Grading Student Writing | Duquesne University

He had students come to his office and read their papers out loud to him. He read along on a essay copy and made brief comments as they read.

How long should i spend grading student essays

In the end, he gave them a grade and told them a few brief comments. This method does require you to be able to handle student reactions to grades in real-time and means you will have to spend time in office hours and scheduling students.

However, this method definitely keeps your time argumentative essay social class essay down to minutes.

How long should i spend grading student essays

Use these tips to grade that stack of Freshman English essays faster and better. B Assignments completed.